Monthly Archive: October 2014

Replenishment 3

Replenishment

Writing books is a solitary activity. It’s easy to get ‘in the groove’ and become a hermit. That’s why it’s important to step away from work often and return to life in the real world. I have several ways to replenish myself; many are related to writing but a few take me to distinct alternatives. 1. I read books from a variety of genres, discuss them with my book club and friends and write down sentences or paragraphs that stop me and request I consider their images/sentence structure/loveliness. 2. I visit with fellow writers. I know, that like a bus...

Part THREE: Sending the Book Forward (publisher and printer) 0

Part THREE: Sending the Book Forward (publisher and printer)

My publisher, Tendril Press, is called a small press. It produces about a dozen books a year. I’m lucky enough to have extra support as well as input with regard to book title, character names, and cover details as well as final approval of the almost finished book. The publisher, Karin Hoffman, is also a graphic artist. She’s the one who designs the cover, the page details, etc that I feel sets my book apart from mass marketed books. She does the final layout then sends it to me one last time for my read-through and final approval. After that,...

84 Ribbons wins Moonbeam Children’s Award 2

84 Ribbons wins Moonbeam Children’s Award

I’m especially grateful for the honor of 84 Ribbons being selected as the Bronze book in the YA-General category by Moonbeam*. Their selection of my first novel shows how important it is for writers to have support from their team: caring critique groups, a strong editor, a personable publisher, professional web support for a tweeked storyline that resonates with readers.  Thanks to my team, my village, that elevated my  idea to a valued story.   *The Mooonbeam awards are designed to bring increased recognition to exemplary children’s books and their creators, and to support childhood literacy and life-long reading. The...

Part TWO: The Editing Process (formal edits) 0

Part TWO: The Editing Process (formal edits)

I am fortunate to have excellent editors helping me refine my books. The first editors offer informal feedback, the second editors are people I pay to work out the kinks. Both serve an important purpose. Let me introduce you to my second level of editors, my formal editors. After my critique groups suggestions are incorporated into my writing, I contact and pay for edits by people who help me ‘fix’ errors in story line, overuse of favored words, punctuation, etc. Usually they are not familiar with my story which is a distinct advantage for me; they do not know anything...